Introducing Navigator

Today we are proud to introduce Navigator, a centralised controller for managing the lifecycle of complex distributed applications. It intends to be the central control point for creating, updating, managing and monitoring stateful databases and services with Kubernetes.

Navigator is open source and extensible from day one. We launch today with support for Elasticsearch in alpha, with Couchbase support soon to land in the next few weeks, and more planned.

Kubernetes 1.3: Hidden Gems

With over 5000 commits and almost 350 contributors from the community and across industry, Kubernetes is now at version 1.3 and launched last week.

It is nearly two years ago that Kubernetes first launched. The scale of community engagement and innovation in the project has been staggering, with individuals collaborating alongside industry leaders (Google, RedHat et al) to push forward and bring production-grade container cluster management to all. This blog will investigate 1.3 and some of the hidden gems found in it.

Automated certificate provisioning in Kubernetes using kube-lego

In this blog post, we are pleased to introduce Kube-Lego, an open source tool for automated Let’s Encrypt TLS-enabled web services running in Kubernetes.

TLS has become increasingly important for production deployment of web services. This has been driven by revelations of surveillance post-Snowden, as well as the fact that Google now favours secure HTTPS sites in search result rankings.

An important step towards increased adoption of TLS has been the availability of Let’s Encrypt. It provides an easy, free-of-charge way to obtain certificates. Certificates are limited to a 90-day lifetime and so the free certificate authority (CA) encourages full automation for ease-of-use. At the time of writing, Let’s Encrypt has approaching 3.5 million unexpired certificates so adoption has certainly been strong.

Kube-Lego automates the process in Kubernetes by watching ingress resources and automatically requesting missing or expired TLS certificates from Let’s Encrypt.

High Availability and Services with Kubernetes

In our previous blog, Getting Started with a Local Deployment, we deployed an Nginx pod to a standalone (single-node) Kubernetes cluster. This pod was bound to a specified node. If the pod were to fail unexpectedly, Kubernetes (specifically, the Kubelet service) would restart the pod. By default, pods have an ‘Always’ restart policy, but only to the node that it is first bound; it will not be rebound to another node. This means of course that if the node fails then pods will not be rescheduled elsewhere.

Kubernetes: Getting Started With a Local Deployment

In Part 1 of this series of blogs, we introduced Kubernetes, an open source container management system from Google, based on operational systems that run over 2 billion containers a week. Kubernetes will very soon be production-ready with the 1.0 release scheduled for this month. In this second part, we will get hands-on, setup a local cluster and deploy a Nginx web server.

Kubernetes: Are you Ready to Manage your Infrastructure like Google?

Google’s Kubernetes open source project for container management has just recently celebrated its first birthday. In its first year, it has attracted massive community and enterprise interest. The numbers speak for themselves: almost 400 contributors from across industry; over 8000 stars and 12000+ commits on Github. And many will have heard it mentioned in almost every other conversation at recent container meetups and industry conferences – no doubt with various different pronunciations!

Containers - The Journey to Production

Tuesday the 21st of April was the inaugural [ Contain ] meetup.

Hosted at the Hoxton Hotel, Shoreditch, we were fortunate to have representation from:

The theme chosen for the event was:

“Containers - The Journey to Production”

Learning From Billion Dollar Startups

If you’ve not seen the Wall Street Journal’s Billion Dollar Startup Club, this article tracks venture-backed private companies valued at $1 billion or more. I thought I would take a look into their technology stacks to see what I could learn. The companies I have chosen to explore aren’t based on any categorisation, they are just highly visible companies that I thought most people would recognise. Obviously these companies are different to your average company, but they are fast-growing, innovative, and perhaps give us a glimpse into the future of computing.

Introducing Jetstack

I made the cut as a millennial by one year. The rate of technological change I have witnessed over the years is amazing. I’ve seen the birth of the web, the first mobile phones in the playground, and the flurry of excitement as the university computing lab is introduced to ‘thefacebook’.